Events: Sutter Creek – Jug Band Annual Festival 2018-03-18T03:52:16+00:00

Sutter Creek Events

Sutter Creek Jug Band Festival
Saturday August 18, 2018

Saturday August 19 on the grounds of the historic Sutter Creek Inn, the International Jug Band Festival will be celebrating its 14th year. This year’s FREE festival will feature old favorites and new bands showcasing the variety and exuberance that is Jug Band Music.

What is Jug Band Music? It is the grass roots of blues, played with any item that will produce music….spoons, saws, fiddles, banjos, wash boards, acoustic guitars, upright bass, homemade bass, and obviously… Jugs.

This festival is a “Kick in the Pants” fun time, with music that will get your feet tapping and set your soul free. Dance the day away or just sit under the shade tents on the lawn and enjoy the most unusual and wonderful music, performed by bands from near and far.

Set in a beautiful outdoor venue on the lawn of the historic Sutter Creek Inn, (the first Bed & Breakfast Inn in California) right on Main Street, Sutter Creek….the heart of the Gold Country.

This little Gold Rush Town is the setting for many events, but the International Jug Band Festival is one of the most unusual. It is a day you will enjoy and remember for a very long time.

This year’s festival brings back the FreeBadge Serenaders, last seen hereabouts in 2011. Other Festival favorites: 5¢ Coffee from Vallejo return.

As usual, the South Sac Jukes will rip things up. Local favorites nJr will be joined by Jugmaster Wayne Hagen, and Willie Norton will solo.

Jailhouse String Band will feature their unique “wall of ukes” sound Festival stalwarts The Babar Jug Band from San Francisco, will again, put a smile on your face. Be sure to see (and hear) the many more acts that will join in on the fun.

This annual gathering of Jug Bands began in 2002 when Andy Fahrenwald and Wayne Hagen brought a variety of Jug Bands from Northern and Southern California together in Minnie Provis Park, in Sutter Creek. It was the first time jug bands in California were able to gather, hear, and meet other jug bands. Over the years the Festival grew and the California Jug Band Association (CJBA) was born.

Jug Band Festivals now happen in San Francisco, Santa Cruz, and a network of jug band musicians grew. CJBA depends on Contributions to The International Jug Band Festival in Sutter Creek to keep this a free event.

CJBA would like to thank the people of Sutter Creek for their support over the years. Andy passed away, but his dream of a free festival celebrating and spreading the joy of jug band music lives on.

Don’t miss this amazing opportunity to enjoy a day of unusual and fun music!

For more information call 267-1344 @ Sutter Creek Visitor Center.

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SUTTER CREEK CALIFORNIA

“Although John Sutter’s sawmill was about forty miles away, Sutter Creek is in the heart of the California Gold Country. Sutter made camp here, trying to avoid the gold rush crowds, but miners soon spilled in and made the town. Mining boomed and then faded…making way for today’s contagion: wine fever. In and around Sutter Creek you can mosey along sidewalks shaded by filigreed balconies.”  – New York Times 36 Hours

Yesterday & Today

The town derives it’s name Sutter Creek after John Sutter. Sutter as early as 1844, had in pursuit of timber, established whipsawing pits and an outdoor manufacturing business named Pine Woods. It was this area near the creek, which runs behind City Hall, that became the site of new and permanent settlement. It is told the settlement started because of a single tent raised there for miners to use on rainy Sundays when they could not get to Jackson or Drytown. Sutter Creek truly established itself permanently when Gold quartz was discovered in 1851 and the became a major supply center.

Among other notable historic landmarks like Knight Foundry and the nearby Kennedy Mine, visitors should take some time to enjoy the historic wine country surrounding Sutter Creek. Wine production in the area dates back one hundred fifty years, when pioneers seeking their fortunes in gold found the ideal climate for growing wine grapes. Today Amador County boasts over 25 wineries and is famous for its red Zinfandels.